Welcome to Rabbits Everywhere

First post coming from #cambridge . Picked up some awesome Rabbit cards @arkcambridge.co.uk #RabbitTravel #rabbits #rabbitsofinstagram #rabbitcards

First post coming from . Picked up some awesome Rabbit cards @arkcambridge.co.uk

I found him! Kudos to @worldofbeatrixpotter for a delightful show! A real treat! #beatrixpotter150years #rabbits #beatrixpotter

I found him! Kudos to @worldofbeatrixpotter for a delightful show! A real treat!

The world’s most famous rabbit #peterrabbit is after over a hundred years a great character, but did you know that the author #beatrixpotter was surprised by his popularity. Thanks to @nationaltrust for making my visit to Beatrix Potter’s Hill Top a great one. #PeterRabbitsCharm #beatrixpotter #beatrixpotter150years #funbuntrivia

The world's most famous rabbit is after over a hundred years a great character, but did you know that the author was surprised by his popularity. Thanks to @nationaltrust for making my visit to Beatrix Potter's Hill Top a great one.

Some rabbits can take pleasure in not being part of the dangerous odyssey that is depicted in Watership Down. Picked up this great mug at @oklahomamcr in #manchester #rabbitsculture #rabbits #rabbitsofinstagram #richardadams #watershipdown

Some rabbits can take pleasure in not being part of the dangerous odyssey that is depicted in Watership Down. Picked up this great mug at @oklahomamcr in

Happy international Rabbit Day everybody! Reposting this lovely post from @regardingcomic . Be sure to check out regardingcomic.tumblr.com #HappyRabbitDay #rabbits

Happy international Rabbit Day everybody! Reposting this lovely post from @regardingcomic . Be sure to check out regardingcomic.tumblr.com

Today is Advent Sunday or first Sunday of Advent. To many, this day signifies the the countdown to Christmas. It is also, “kind-of”, marks the day when people start Christmas decorating their homes. In our window sill, we placed this little rabbit to ponder about the meaning of Christmas… or maybe he’s just smelling the hyacinths. #advent #firstsundayofadvent #rabbit #decoration

Today is Advent Sunday or first Sunday of Advent. To many, this day signifies the the countdown to Christmas. It is also, "kind-of", marks the day when people start Christmas decorating their homes. In our window sill, we placed this little rabbit to ponder about the meaning of Christmas... or maybe he's just smelling the hyacinths.

I’m reposting this from the always lovely Beatrix Potter IG account. Rabbits really do love Christmas and you can see this clearly in Potter’s “The Rabbit’s Christmas Party”. I dearly recommend checking out the paintings #MerryChristmas #rabbits #Christmas #BeatrixPotter #RabbitChristmas

I'm reposting this from the always lovely Beatrix Potter IG account. Rabbits really do love Christmas and you can see this clearly in Potter's "The Rabbit's Christmas Party". I dearly recommend checking out the paintings

Beatrix Potter’s “The Rabbit’s Christmas Party” is a frieze made in 1890. This work of art is like looking into my soul.
Here’s the story: “On a wet December day, the rabbits gathered for a Christmas party. Rabbits don’t like rain, so they wore raincoats. One rabbit brought an umbrella.” #RabbitChristmasParty1 #rabbits #RabbitsInCulture #Christmas #beatrixpotter

Beatrix Potter's "The Rabbit's Christmas Party" is a frieze made in 1890. This work of art is like looking into my soul. 
Here's the story: "On a wet December day, the rabbits gathered for a Christmas party. Rabbits don't like rain, so they wore raincoats. One rabbit brought an umbrella."

“The room was decorated for Christmas with holly on the walls. When the rabbits sat down to eat, there were not enough chairs. So some rabbits sat on baskets.” Taken from Beatrix Potter’s frieze The Rabbit’s Christmas Party #RabbitChristmasParty2 #rabbitsinculture #rabbits #christmas #beatrixpotter

"The room was decorated for Christmas with holly on the walls. When the rabbits sat down to eat, there were not enough chairs. So some rabbits sat on baskets." Taken from Beatrix Potter's frieze The Rabbit's Christmas Party

“After dinner, the table was pushed aside, and the rabbits danced in a circle. One rabbit provided music by playing the pipe.”
Taken from Beatrix Potter’s frieze The Rabbit’s Christmas Party #RabbitChristmasParty3 #rabbitsinculture #rabbits #christmas #beatrixpotter

"After dinner, the table was pushed aside, and the rabbits danced in a circle. One rabbit provided music by playing the pipe."
Taken from Beatrix Potter's frieze The Rabbit's Christmas Party

“When the piper became tired, the rabbits started a game of “Blind Man’s Bluff.” One rabbit would be blindfolded. Then that rabbit would try to tag the other rabbits. When a rabbit was tagged, he or she would be blindfolded and the game would start again.” Taken from Beatrix Potter’s frieze The Rabbit’s Christmas Party #RabbitChristmasParty4 #rabbitsinculture #rabbits #christmas #beatrixpotter

"When the piper became tired, the rabbits started a game of "Blind Man's Bluff." One rabbit would be blindfolded. Then that rabbit would try to tag the other rabbits. When a rabbit was tagged, he or she would be blindfolded and the game would start again." Taken from Beatrix Potter's frieze The Rabbit's Christmas Party

“For dessert, the rabbits roasted apples. They tied apples to strings and hung them by the fire. The rabbit who watched them used a cabbage leaf to keep her face from getting too hot. After all of the food and exercise, some of the rabbits had trouble staying awake around the warm fireplace.”
Taken from Beatrix Potter’s frieze The Rabbit’s Christmas Party. #RabbitChristmasParty5 #rabbitsinculture #rabbits #christmas #beatrixpotter

"For dessert, the rabbits roasted apples. They tied apples to strings and hung them by the fire. The rabbit who watched them used a cabbage leaf to keep her face from getting too hot. After all of the food and exercise, some of the rabbits had trouble staying awake around the warm fireplace."
Taken from Beatrix Potter's frieze The Rabbit's Christmas Party.

“After dessert, it was time to go. The rabbits found their coats by candlelight. Then they said goodbye all around before they set out.” Taken from Beatrix Potter’s frieze The Rabbit’s Christmas Party. #RabbitChristmasParty6 #rabbitsinculture #rabbits #christmas #beatrixpotter

"After dessert, it was time to go. The rabbits found their coats by candlelight. Then they said goodbye all around before they set out." Taken from Beatrix Potter's frieze The Rabbit's Christmas Party.

During my visit to the biological museum in Stockholm, I saw a “skvader” on display. A Skvader is fantasy hybrid of a hare and a capercaillie. In the late 19th century, a Swedish newspaper reported that a skvader had been shot in the woods of northern Sweden. This sparked the imagination of taxidermists who made skvaders from the skin of mountain hares and capercaillies. This one is made by taxidermist Werner Berg who worked for Stockholm’s biological museum. #TheSkvader #skvader #rabbit #rabbits #rabbitsinculture #hares #hare #capercaillie #trivia

During my visit to the biological museum in Stockholm, I saw a "skvader" on display. A Skvader is fantasy hybrid of a hare and a capercaillie. In the late 19th century, a Swedish newspaper reported that a skvader had been shot in the woods of northern Sweden. This sparked the imagination of taxidermists who made skvaders from the skin of mountain hares and capercaillies. This one is made by taxidermist Werner Berg who worked for Stockholm's biological museum.

Did you know that the patron saint of rabbits and hares is St Melangell? The story of St Melangell might resemble a fairy tale, but is in fact true. • In the early 7th Century, Melangell, the daughter of an Irish king, fled to a beautiful spot at the head of the Tanat Valley in Wales, where she lived a peaceful solitary life until the Prince of Powys went hunting, and a frightened hare took refuge under Melangell’s cloak. The Prince’s dogs were subdued and, deeply impressed, he gave her the valley to create a sanctuary. Ever since, Pennant Melangell has been a place of pilgrimage, and Melangell remains the patron saint of hares, rabbits, small animals, and the natural environment. #ThePatronSaintOfRabbits #rabbitsinculture #rabbits #hares #saints #stmelangell #trivia

Did you know that the patron saint of rabbits and hares is St Melangell?  The story of St Melangell might resemble a fairy tale, but is in fact true. • In the early 7th Century, Melangell, the daughter of an Irish king, fled to a beautiful spot at the head of the Tanat Valley in Wales, where she lived a peaceful solitary life until the Prince of Powys went hunting, and a frightened hare took refuge under Melangell’s cloak. The Prince’s dogs were subdued and, deeply impressed, he gave her the valley to create a sanctuary. Ever since, Pennant Melangell has been a place of pilgrimage, and Melangell remains the patron saint of hares, rabbits, small animals, and the natural environment.

When I visited the Metropolitan museum in New York I saw this samurai helmet in shape of a crouching rabbit.
These helmets are called Kabuto and they were worn by ancient Japanese warriors. They became an important part of the traditional Japanese armour worn by the samurai class and their retainers in feudal Japan.

This specific helmet is from the 17th century.
#Kabuto #rabbitsinculture #japan #samurai #rabbits #trivia

When I visited the Metropolitan museum in New York I saw this samurai helmet in shape of a crouching rabbit. 
These helmets are called Kabuto and they were worn by ancient Japanese warriors.  They became an important part of the traditional Japanese armour worn by the samurai class and their retainers in feudal Japan.

This specific helmet is from the 17th century.

Usagi Yojimbo (兎用心棒) is a comic book character created by Stan Sakai. Usagi Yojimbo depicts a rabbit on his musha shugyō (warrior’s pilgrimage), occasionally selling his services as a bodyguard. In fact Usagi Yojimbo translates into Rabbit Bodyguard in Japanese.
The stories of Usagi Yojimbo mostly take place in Japan during the Edo period (between 1603 and 1868). Usagi Yojimbo is heavily influenced by Japanese cinema and has included references to the work of Akira Kurosawa (the title of the series is derived from Kurosawa’s 1960 film Yojimbo) and to icons of popular Japanese cinema such as Lone Wolf and Cub, Zatoichi, and Godzilla.

#UsagiYojimbo #rabbitsinculture #japan #samurai #comics #rabbits #trivia

Usagi Yojimbo (兎用心棒) is a comic book character created by Stan Sakai. Usagi Yojimbo depicts a rabbit on his musha shugyō (warrior's pilgrimage), occasionally selling his services as a bodyguard. In fact Usagi Yojimbo translates into Rabbit Bodyguard in Japanese. 
The stories of Usagi Yojimbo mostly take place in Japan during the Edo period (between 1603 and 1868). Usagi Yojimbo is heavily influenced by Japanese cinema and has included references to the work of Akira Kurosawa (the title of the series is derived from Kurosawa's 1960 film Yojimbo) and to icons of popular Japanese cinema such as Lone Wolf and Cub, Zatoichi, and Godzilla.

One of the most iconic rabbits in litterateur is the white rabbit in Alice’s adventures in Wonderland, written by Lewis Carroll in 1865.
The white rabbit is an eccentric and high-strung gentleman who is wary of the time. In the beginning of the book when Alice sees him, he can be heard muttering: “Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!” The white rabbit in Wonderland has had a large influence on pop culture. Besides many adaptations of the book, the white rabbit has appeared in other works too.

The symbolism of the rabbit and its rabbit hole has appeared in countless movies and songs. In the movie Matrix, Neo is told to “follow the white rabbit” and to take the red pill in order to “find out just how deep the rabbit hole goes”. Another example is the song White Rabbit by Jefferson Airplane that makes uses the character and the Wonderland saga as metaphors for drug-induced experiences.
Even in Star Trek (the original series) there is an episode where Doctor McCoy sees the white rabbit.

The original illustration of the White Rabbit is made by Sir John Tenniel.

#TheWhiteRabbit #AlicesAdventuresInWonderland #rabbitsinculture #rabbits #popculture #LewisCarroll #trivia #litterateur

One of the most iconic rabbits in litterateur is the white rabbit in Alice's adventures in Wonderland, written by Lewis Carroll in 1865. 
The white rabbit is an eccentric and high-strung gentleman who is wary of the time.  In the beginning of the book when Alice sees him, he can be heard muttering: "Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!" The white rabbit in Wonderland has had a large influence on pop culture. Besides many adaptations of the book, the white rabbit has appeared in other works too.

The symbolism of the rabbit and its rabbit hole has appeared in countless movies and songs. In the movie Matrix, Neo is told to "follow the white rabbit" and to take the red pill in order to "find out just how deep the rabbit hole goes". Another example is the song White Rabbit by Jefferson Airplane that makes uses the character and the Wonderland saga as metaphors for drug-induced experiences. 
Even in Star Trek (the original series) there is an episode where Doctor McCoy sees the white rabbit.

The original illustration of the White Rabbit is made by Sir John Tenniel.

Three years ago my fiancée and myself went to a small picturesque town called Söderköping, which is located about 140 km south of Stockholm.
In Söderköping there is a fixed art installation in the form of several rabbits that are crossing a canal. The canal is called Göta Canal and it was an important route for waterway transportation in Sweden in the early 19th century.

The installation, which is called “Rabbit Crossing”, depicts several rabbits that jump in the water on one side and help each other to get up on the other side. It could easily be a scene from Richard Adam’s Watership Down.

All in all it is a remarkable piece of art that is part of larger set of installations called “Visions by the water”. Eva Fornåå is the artist and her story for making the bronze statues is very poetic (I’m paraphrasing): Whether you are a rabbit that needs to cross the canal, or you are a man that needs to go on the canal somewhere, you both need patience, courage, cooperation and compassion. We all some time need a helping hand from someone else. We have more in common with our rabbit friends than we think and we should therefore learn this lesson from the rabbits.

#RabbitCrossing #rabbitstatue #RabbitsInCulture #EvaFornåå #GötaKanal #söderköping #rabbits #trivia

Three years ago my fiancée and myself went to a small picturesque town called Söderköping, which is located about 140 km south of Stockholm. 
In Söderköping there is a fixed art installation in the form of several rabbits that are crossing a canal. The canal is called Göta Canal and it was an important route for waterway transportation in Sweden in the early 19th century.

The installation, which is called "Rabbit Crossing", depicts several rabbits that jump in the water on one side and help each other to get up on the other side. It could easily be a scene from Richard Adam's Watership Down.

All in all it is a remarkable piece of art that is part of larger set of installations called "Visions by the water". Eva Fornåå is the artist and her story for making the bronze statues is very poetic (I'm paraphrasing): Whether you are a rabbit that needs to cross the canal, or you are a man that needs to go on the canal somewhere, you both need patience, courage, cooperation and compassion. We all some time need a helping hand from someone else. We have more in common with our rabbit friends than we think and we should therefore learn this lesson from the rabbits.

One of my favorite composers turned 80 on January 31. Philip Glass with his minimalistic hypnotic music is one of the most influential music makers alive today. Check out this Spotify playlist if you want to listen to his music: http://spoti.fi/2kn0O3F

I wanted to highlight this occasion, but in doing so I also needed a connection to rabbits. So where is the rabbit angle this time around?
Well, I found out that the very imaginative illustrator Graham Percy had painted Philip Glass tripping in a rabbit hole.
New Zealand-born Graham Percy’s triptych is called: “Philip Glass trips in a rabbit hole at Crear”. It is a black and white sequence of the composer’s misstep into a rabbit hole in western Scotland.
If you swing by the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh, you can see the artwork for yourself.

Also worth mentioning is that Graham Percy also illustrated the children’s book “The velveteen rabbit”

Copyright Graham Percy

#PhilipGlass #GrahamPercy #RabbitInCulture #GlassAt80 #rabbits #trivia #RabbitsAndMusic

One of my favorite composers turned 80 on January 31. Philip Glass with his minimalistic hypnotic music is one of the most influential music makers alive today. Check out this Spotify playlist if you want to listen to his music: http://spoti.fi/2kn0O3F

I wanted to highlight this occasion, but in doing so I also needed a connection to rabbits. So where is the rabbit angle this time around? 
Well, I found out that the very imaginative illustrator Graham Percy had painted Philip Glass tripping in a rabbit hole. 
New Zealand-born Graham Percy's triptych is called: "Philip Glass trips in a rabbit hole at Crear". It is a black and white sequence of the composer's misstep into a rabbit hole in western Scotland. 
If you swing by the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh, you can see the artwork for yourself.

Also worth mentioning is that Graham Percy also illustrated the children's book "The velveteen rabbit"

Copyright  Graham Percy

Even though the short film The Maker (2011) does not specifically say it’s main character is a rabbit, it is hard not to see the resemblance.
The “Tim Burton-esque” rabbit-looking creature that we encounter in the stop motion picture is the brainchild of Australian film maker Christopher Kezelos.
This thought provoking film is about a violin playing rabbit’s race against time to make the most important and beautiful creation of his life.

When explaining what themes The Maker is addressing, Christopher Kezelos said this: “The Maker explores the preciousness of our moments on earth, the short time we have with loved ones and the enjoyment of one’s life’s work and purpose.” The soundtrack is taken from one of Australia’s most popular and innovative composers of classical music, Paul Halley.
Check out the movie at: www.themakerfilm.com

#TheMaker #RabbitInCulture #Rabbits #ShortFilms #StopMotion #StopMotionAnimation #movies #ChristopherKezelos #PaulHalley #Trivia #RabbitsAndFilm

Even though the short film The Maker (2011) does not specifically say it's main character is a rabbit, it is hard not to see the resemblance. 
The "Tim Burton-esque" rabbit-looking creature that we encounter in the stop motion picture is the brainchild of Australian film maker Christopher Kezelos. 
This thought provoking film is about a violin playing rabbit's race against time to make the most important and beautiful creation of his life.

When explaining what themes The Maker is addressing, Christopher Kezelos said this: "The Maker explores the preciousness of our moments on earth, the short time we have with loved ones and the enjoyment of one’s life’s work and purpose." The soundtrack is taken from one of Australia's most popular and innovative composers of classical music, Paul Halley. 
Check out the movie at: www.themakerfilm.com

Did you know that Mickey Mouse at one point actually was meant to be a rabbit called Oswald?

In 1927 Walt Disney and his colleague Ub Iwerks were working on a series of animated shorts. The main character became Oswald the Lucky Rabbit.
Walt and Ub wanted a multifaceted character that was peppy, saucy and venturesome. It was meant to be the first character that actually had a personality.

The animated shorts with Oswald also played to surreal aspects of the character. For instance Oswald could dismember parts of his own body to accomplish things. He could for instance make propellers out of his ears to fly away.

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit was during his 1920’s tenure a smash hit among audiences. He was destined to be THE Disney star.
That didn’t happen, so what happened?
Walt Disney had signed a deal with the producer Charles Mintz for the animated shorts and thus gave away the rights for Oswald to Universal. When the two parted ways, Walt couldn’t continue to create stories for Oswald.

Walt then moved on to create Mickey Mouse who doesn’t need any introduction.

Disney’s popular rabbit creation was more or less forgotten for 80 years when the Walt Disney Company acquired the rights to Oswald again in an incredible transaction.
In 2006 American sports announcer Al Michaels wanted to cancel his contract with US television network ESPN (owned by the Walt Disney company) in order to move US television network NBC who’s subsidiary is Universal.

Since Disney COO Bob Iger knew how much Walt Disney loved Oswald he proposed an unconventional deal. He said that the transfer could be done if NBC handed Oswald back over to Disney.
In other words, a real person was traded for a 80 year old cartoon rabbit.

Since then, several animated shorts and games starring Oswald have been released. One of the most notable new works is the game Epic Mickey where Mickey encounters Oswald and becomes friends.

I guess Oswald was lucky after all!

#Oswald #OswaldTheLuckyRabbit #Disney #WaltDisney #MickeyMouse #Universal #NBC #ESPN #BobIger #UbIwerks #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Cartoons #AnimatedShort #Trivia #RabbitsAndFilm #RabbitsInGames

Did you know that Mickey Mouse at one point actually was meant to be a rabbit called Oswald?

In 1927 Walt Disney and his colleague Ub Iwerks were working on a series of animated shorts. The main character became Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. 
Walt and Ub wanted a multifaceted character that was peppy, saucy and venturesome. It was meant to be the first character that actually had a personality.

The animated shorts with Oswald also played to surreal aspects of the character. For instance Oswald could dismember parts of his own body to accomplish things. He could for instance make propellers out of his ears to fly away.

Oswald the Lucky Rabbit was during his 1920's tenure a smash hit among audiences. He was destined to be THE Disney star. 
That didn't happen, so what happened?
Walt Disney had signed a deal with the producer Charles Mintz for the animated shorts and thus gave away the rights for Oswald to Universal. When the two parted ways, Walt couldn't continue to create stories for Oswald.

Walt then moved on to create Mickey Mouse who doesn't need any introduction.

Disney's popular rabbit creation was more or less forgotten for 80 years when the Walt Disney Company acquired the rights to Oswald again in an incredible transaction. 
In 2006 American sports announcer Al Michaels wanted to cancel his contract with US television network ESPN (owned by the Walt Disney company) in order to move US television network NBC who's subsidiary is Universal.

Since Disney COO Bob Iger knew how much Walt Disney loved Oswald he proposed an unconventional deal. He said that the transfer could be done if NBC handed Oswald back over to Disney. 
In other words, a real person was traded for a 80 year old cartoon rabbit.

Since then, several animated shorts and games starring Oswald have been released. One of the most notable new works is the game Epic Mickey where Mickey encounters Oswald and becomes friends.

I guess Oswald was lucky after all!

The Vampire Rabbit of Newcastle is a mysterious grotesque gargoyle that you can find above the rear door of the historic St Nicholas Cathedral.

Nobody really knows the background story behind the vampire rabbit, but it is rumored that the rabbit was placed there to scare off grave robbers.

#VampireRabbit #RabbitInCulture #Rabbits #RabbitSculpture #Trivia #RabbitGargoyle

The Vampire Rabbit of Newcastle is a mysterious grotesque gargoyle that you can find above the rear door of the historic  St Nicholas Cathedral.

Nobody really knows the background story behind the vampire rabbit, but it is rumored that the rabbit was placed there to scare off grave robbers.

When I grew up as a kid I had a postcard on my wall depicting a wild hare. It was no ordinary hare… It was the famous “Feldhase” created by renaissance painter, theorist, printmaker and mathematician Albrecht Dürer.
This awesome watercolor painting was made by Dürer in 1502. It is considered to be one of the most astonishing pieces of observational art, not only during the renaissance era, but of all time!

Once every decade you have the possibility to see the painting in real life. However you need to prepare first. Due to preservation issues, the Albertina museum in Vienna cannot have the painting on permanent display. Next time will probably be in 2024. I will then most definitely go to Vienna to see the original motif of my childhood wall decoration.

#FeldHase #Hares #RabbitsInCulture #HaresInCulture #Rabbits #AlbrechtDürer #Trivia #Art #ObservationalArt #Renaissance #RenaissancePainting

When I grew up as a kid I had a postcard on my wall depicting a wild hare. It was no ordinary hare... It was the famous "Feldhase" created by renaissance painter, theorist, printmaker and mathematician Albrecht Dürer. 
This awesome watercolor painting was made by Dürer in 1502. It is considered to be one of the most astonishing pieces of observational art, not only during the renaissance era, but of all time!

Once every decade you have the possibility to see the painting in real life. However you need to prepare first. Due to preservation issues, the Albertina museum in Vienna cannot have the painting on permanent display. Next time will probably be in 2024. I will then most definitely go to Vienna to see the original motif of my childhood wall decoration.

Sometimes you just need to kick back and relax with a well-deserved drink. Obviously we need to do this with a rabbit-themed cocktail. On the photo above, you see my newly stirred Ginger Rabbit.
The Ginger Rabbit is a bourbon-based cocktail with a homemade black tea syrup. Pretty nice, huh? Here is the recipe: * 1,5-2 cl Star Anise and Black Tea Infused Simple Syrup
* 1 slice Fresh ginger
* 1 strip Lemon peel
* 6 cl Bourbon
* 1,5-2 cl Crème Yvette * 1 dash Angostura bitters

Here is how you prepare the syrup:

Add a black tea bag to the simple syrup (one part sugar, one part warm water) and let infuse for 12 minutes. Then throw away the tea bag and add the 6 star anise pods (lightly crushed). Let the syrup stand before using it in the cocktail.

Enjoy!

#GingerRabbit #RabbitsAndDrinks #Cocktails #Cocktails #Bourbon #Angostura #CremeYvette #BlackTea #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

Sometimes you just need to kick back and relax with a well-deserved drink. Obviously we need to do this with a rabbit-themed cocktail. On the photo above, you see my newly stirred Ginger Rabbit. 
The Ginger Rabbit is a bourbon-based cocktail with a homemade black tea syrup. Pretty nice, huh? Here is the recipe: * 1,5-2 cl Star Anise and Black Tea Infused Simple Syrup
* 1 slice Fresh ginger
* 1 strip Lemon peel
* 6 cl Bourbon
* 1,5-2 cl Crème Yvette * 1 dash Angostura bitters

Here is how you prepare the syrup:

Add a black tea bag to the simple syrup (one part sugar, one part warm water) and let infuse for 12 minutes. Then throw away the tea bag and add the 6 star anise pods (lightly crushed). Let the syrup stand before using it in the cocktail.

Enjoy!

Ce me fait plaisir que les lapins ont trouvé un place sûr un logo pour un chaine restaurant 😉 Speed Rabbit Pizza is a French pizza fast food chain that is headquartered in Paris. It was founded in 1991 and was modeled after US American fast food chains that offered express home delivery.

Due to it’s home delivery business model, Speed Rabbit Pizza’s management selected a running rabbit to express the company’s focus on speedy deliveries.
#SpeedRabbit #Fastfood #FrenchRestaurant #Pizza #PizzaDelivery #RabbitsRestaurants #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

Ce me fait plaisir que les lapins ont trouvé un place sûr un logo pour un chaine restaurant ;) Speed Rabbit Pizza is a French pizza fast food chain that is headquartered in Paris. It was founded in 1991 and was modeled after US American fast food chains that offered express home delivery.

Due to it's home delivery business model, Speed Rabbit Pizza's management selected a running rabbit to express the company's focus on speedy deliveries.

Always on the lookout for rabbits when traveling. When visiting the Sik Sik Yuen temple in Hong Kong, I saw this representation of the rabbit from the Chinese zodiac.

The temple is dedicated to the deity Wong Tai Sin. He was a shepherd that transformed boulders into sheep. He also knew how to cure all illnesses. Very convenient, I understand why he got a temple . Too bad he didn’t transform the boulders into rabbits instead. 🐇 #SikSikYuen #Taoism #Temple #rabbitzodiac #RabbitsInReligion #China #HongKong #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #trivia

Always on the lookout for rabbits when traveling. When visiting the Sik Sik Yuen temple in Hong Kong, I saw this representation of the rabbit from the Chinese zodiac.

The temple is dedicated to the deity Wong Tai Sin. He was a shepherd that transformed boulders into sheep. He also knew how to cure all illnesses. Very convenient, I understand why he got a temple . Too bad he didn't transform the boulders into rabbits instead. 🐇

More travel rabbits coming up!

I don’t have so much trivia for you this time, I just thought it was cool that they decorated the hotel lobby with this huge rabbit for Easter. I will discuss the Easter rabbit a bit more in depth next week when the Easter rabbit comes to visit us.
Ok, changed my mind, here comes a little bit of trivial: In 2017, Western and Eastern Christianity share the same date for Easter: 16 April.
This does not happen each year. This is because Western churches use the Gregorian calendar, the standard calendar for much of the world, and Orthodox churches use the older, Julian calendar.

#MacauEasterRabbit #Hotels #Macau #Sofitel #RabbitsInReligion #China #RabbitsInCulture #RabbitsInHotelLobbys #Rabbits #Trivia #christianity

More travel rabbits coming up!

I don't have so much trivia for you this time, I just thought it was cool that they decorated the hotel lobby with this huge rabbit for Easter. I will discuss the Easter rabbit a bit more in depth next week when the Easter rabbit comes to visit us. 
Ok, changed my mind, here comes a little bit of trivial: In 2017, Western and Eastern Christianity share the same date for Easter: 16 April. 
This does not happen each year. This is because Western churches use the Gregorian calendar, the standard calendar for much of the world, and Orthodox churches use the older, Julian calendar.

When strolling the streets of Macau, I saw this cool rabbit art exhibition.
The art installation is called “Little Rabbit Lanterns” and it consists of both small colorful rabbits hanging from above, as well as larger ones with interesting patters. Nice!

The person behind it all is Macanese architect, artist, poet and cultural conservationist Carlos Marreiros.
He also designed the Macau Pavilion at the Shanghai World Expo 2010, which was also shaped as a rabbit.

#LittleRabbitLanterns #Macau #Art #RabbitsInArt #RabbitsInArchitecture #Architecture #ArtExibition #CarlosMarreiros #China #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

When strolling the streets of Macau, I saw this cool rabbit art exhibition. 
The art installation is called "Little Rabbit Lanterns" and it consists of both small colorful rabbits hanging from above, as well as larger ones with interesting patters. Nice!

The person behind it all is Macanese architect, artist, poet and cultural conservationist Carlos Marreiros. 
He also designed the Macau Pavilion at the Shanghai World Expo 2010, which was also shaped as a rabbit.

Places like Hong Kong and Tokyo are very densely populated. Because of this people often live in small apartments and hence they find it hard to keep pets at home.
That’s why different pet cafes have opened in these cities. They are cafes where you get to meet, pet and feed your favorite pet animals. I read about the these cafes online and I was of course happy to see that there were so called “rabbit cafes” or “usagi cafes” in both Tokyo and Hong Kong.

Last Saturday I made a reservation at the rabbit cafe in Hong Kong called “RabbitLand”. Here I got to meet resident rabbits like Momo and Mimi. They really knew how to entertain the guests.

It was a great experience. Thanks @rabbitlandcafe 🐇 #RabbitLand #Rabbitcafe #Usagicafe #Usagi #HongKong #Cafe #China #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #trivia

Places like Hong Kong and Tokyo are very densely populated. Because of this people often live in small apartments and hence they find it hard to keep pets at home. 
That's why different pet cafes have opened in these cities. They are cafes where you get to meet, pet and feed your favorite pet animals. I read about the these cafes online and I was of course happy to see that there were so called "rabbit cafes" or "usagi cafes" in both Tokyo and Hong Kong.

Last Saturday I made a reservation at the rabbit cafe in Hong Kong called "RabbitLand". Here I got to meet resident rabbits like Momo and Mimi. They really knew how to entertain the guests.

It was a great experience. Thanks @rabbitlandcafe 🐇

I just saw this street art of pink rabbits in Valencia. Valencia is a beautiful city located on the south eastern coast of the land of the rabbits.

Wait, what now??? Yes, Spain roughly stands for “the land of the rabbits”

When the Carthaginians came to Spain around 300 b.c. they called the country Ispania (from Sphan, “rabbit”), which means “land of the rabbits.” The Romans arrived a century later and adopted the Carthaginian name of the country, calling it Hispania.  Later, this became the present day Spanish name for the country, España.
#TheLandOfRabbits #RabbitsInArt #RabbitStreetArt #StreetArt #Valencia #Spain #RabbitsInCulture #Conejo #Rabbits #RabbitsInHistory #History #España #portal #portal2 #companioncube #trivia

I just saw this street art of pink rabbits in Valencia. Valencia is a beautiful city located on the south eastern coast of the land of the rabbits.

Wait, what now??? Yes, Spain roughly stands for "the land of the rabbits" 

When the Carthaginians came to Spain around 300 b.c. they called the country Ispania (from Sphan, "rabbit"), which means "land of the rabbits." The Romans arrived a century later and adopted the Carthaginian name of the country, calling it Hispania.  Later, this became the present day Spanish name for the country, España.

With the epic return of Twin Peaks, one has to discuss the fact that rabbits have played a prominent role in David Lynch’s body of work throughout the years.
The most notable piece of rabbit work is the surrealist sitcom “Rabbits” (2002). It is hard to explain, but it is awesome. The tag line itself is crazy cool: “In a nameless city deluged by a continuous rain… three rabbits live with a fearful mystery”

David Lynch says it is a nine-episode series, but there are only eight . When Lynch accepted his life time achievement award at the Stockholm film festival in 2003, I asked him (in a Q&A) where the final ninth episode was. Lynch, of course, avoided the question.

The Rabbits footage and storyline were also interwoven with Lynch’s 2007 feature film Inland Empire. Pretty cool!

As for Twin Peaks, we have yet to see if the chocolate bunnies will help Hawk to find “what is missing”.

#DavidLynch #RabbitsInArt #Rabbit #RabbitsInFilm #Surrealism #InlandEmpire #Sitcom #DarkComedy #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #TwinPeaks #trivia

With the epic return of Twin Peaks, one has to discuss the fact that rabbits have played a prominent role in David Lynch's body of work throughout the years. 
The most notable piece of rabbit work is the surrealist sitcom "Rabbits" (2002). It is hard to explain, but it is awesome. The tag line itself is crazy cool: "In a nameless city deluged by a continuous rain... three rabbits live with a fearful mystery"

David Lynch says it is a nine-episode series, but there are only eight . When Lynch accepted his life time achievement award at the Stockholm film festival in 2003, I asked him (in a Q&A) where the final ninth episode was. Lynch, of course, avoided the question.

The Rabbits footage and storyline were also interwoven with Lynch's 2007 feature film Inland Empire. Pretty cool!

As for Twin Peaks, we have yet to see if the chocolate bunnies will help Hawk to find "what is missing".

RabbitsEverywhere is back from a longer hiatus and this time around the rabbit post comes from Taoyuan City in Taiwan.
I just visited a great tea shop very nicely named Rabbit Rabbit Tea. (@rabbitrabbittea ) It is a chain of tea shops and I had a very nice Lady gray tea latte. Good stuff! 🥛

As for trivia: when I googled rabbits and tea, I came across something called “rabbit manure tea”. It is apparently a super great fertilizer for crops. This is because rabbit manure is higher in nitrogen than sheep, goat, pig, chicken, cow or horse manure. As maybe some of you know, plants need nitrogen to produce a lush green growth.

#RabbitRabbitTea #RabbitsEverywhere #Tea #The #RabbitStreetFood #Rabbit #RabbitsCafe #Rabbits #Usagi #Trivia #TaoyuanCity #taiwan

RabbitsEverywhere is back from a longer hiatus and this time around the rabbit post comes from Taoyuan City in Taiwan. 
I just visited a great tea shop very nicely named Rabbit Rabbit Tea. (@rabbitrabbittea ) It is a chain of tea shops and I had a very nice Lady gray tea latte. Good stuff! 🥛

As for trivia: when I googled rabbits and tea, I came across something called "rabbit manure tea". It is apparently a super great fertilizer for crops. This is because rabbit manure is higher in nitrogen than sheep, goat, pig, chicken, cow or horse manure. As maybe some of you know, plants need nitrogen to produce a lush green growth.

Last month I treated myself some new rabbit accessories from my favorite fashion designer Paul Smith. I bought two ties and one handkerchief to match my already purchased Paul Smith cuff links.

So why do I have a favorite fashion designer? Well it is partly because PS are making cool clothes, but most of all because they incorporate rabbits in their designs. The ties, handkerchief and cuff links all have rabbits on them. I have also owned approx 8-9 pairs of Paul Smith’s sneaker model called “Rabbit”. Some info/trivia about Paul Smith: In 2009 the London design museum launched its Super contemporary exhibition. Among the designs you could find Paul’s rabbit trash bin. The rabbit holds a bag in its paws and – when it receives your trash – its ears light up and sparkle to congratulate you on your tidy behaviour.

#PaulSmith #Fashion #Rabbits&Clothes #RabbitsInFashion #Rabbit #Ties #Cufflinks #Handkerchief #Rabbits #Usagi #Art #RabbitsInArt #Design #London #trivia

Last month I treated myself some new rabbit accessories from my favorite fashion designer Paul Smith. I bought two ties and one handkerchief to match my already purchased Paul Smith cuff links.

So why do I have a favorite fashion designer? Well it is partly because PS are making cool clothes, but most of all because they incorporate rabbits in their designs. The ties, handkerchief and cuff links all have rabbits on them.  I have also owned approx 8-9 pairs of Paul Smith's sneaker model called "Rabbit". Some info/trivia about Paul Smith: In 2009 the London design museum launched its Super contemporary exhibition. Among the designs you could find Paul's rabbit trash bin. The rabbit holds a bag in its paws and - when it receives your trash - its ears light up and sparkle to congratulate you on your tidy behaviour.

#Rabbits&Clothes

Today I’m off from work because of Moon Cake festival here in Taiwan.
The moon festival celebrates the full moon that can be seen on the 15th day of the 8th month according to the Chinese lunar calendar.

During the celebration, people spend time with friends and family and eat so called moon cakes.
Most of the festival’s customs are related to the moon and….here come’s the kicker, the Jade Rabbit.

The Jade Rabbit (or Moon Rabbit) has its own intriguing story so I will do a separate post about it. As for this post, let’s just briefly go through how the rabbit is celebrated during this festival.

The evening before the Moon Festival, friends and family gather together to eat cakes, drink tea, drink wine. On the day of the moon festival, offerings are made to the moon by placing them on a Celebration table, that is decorated with, you’ve guessed it, a clay figure of the Jade Rabbit.

#MoonFestival #MidAutumnFestival #MoonCakeFestival #JadeRabbit #月兔 #中秋節 #Rabbitzodiac #RabbitsInReligion #China #Taiwan #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #trivia

Today I’m off from work because of Moon Cake festival here in Taiwan. 
The moon festival celebrates the full moon that can be seen on the 15th day of the 8th month according to the Chinese lunar calendar.

During the celebration, people spend time with friends and family and eat so called moon cakes. 
Most of the festival’s customs are related to the moon and....here come’s the kicker, the Jade Rabbit.

The Jade Rabbit (or Moon Rabbit) has its own intriguing story so I will do a separate post about it. As for this post, let’s just briefly go through how the rabbit is celebrated during this festival.

The evening before the Moon Festival, friends and family gather together to eat cakes, drink tea, drink wine. On the day of the moon festival, offerings are made to the moon by placing them on a Celebration table, that is decorated with, you’ve guessed it, a clay figure of the Jade Rabbit.

The moon rabbit is a folklore character that fascinates me because it exists in many cultures around the world.
Throughout various civilizations people have looked up onto the moon and have concluded the same thing, namely that they seen the shape of a rabbit. You can e.g. read stories of the Moon Rabbit from the ancient Aztecs and several eastern cultures.
This post will focus on the Chinese version of the Moon Rabbit, also known as the Jade Rabbit.

In Chinese folklore we follow three immortals who reincarnated themselves into three poor old people. They begged for food from a fox, a monkey and a rabbit. The fox and monkey both gave food to the immortals.
When they approached the rabbit, the rabbit told them that he didn’t have any food. Instead the rabbit told them: “you can eat me” and jumped into the fire. The immortals were so moved by the rabbit’s actions and sent it to the moon to become an immortal jade rabbit.
Ever since, the jade rabbit stayed in the Moon Palace to accompany the Moon goodness Chang’E and produced immortal medicine for those who live in heaven.

#ChineseMoonRabbit #MoonRabbit #RabbitFolklore #JadeRabbit #Aztec #Japan #Korea #月兔 #中秋節 #Rabbitzodiac #RabbitsInReligion #China #Taiwan #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #trivia

The moon rabbit is a folklore character that fascinates me because it exists in many cultures around the world. 
Throughout various civilizations people have looked up onto the moon and have concluded the same thing, namely that they seen the shape of a rabbit. You can e.g. read stories of the Moon Rabbit from the ancient Aztecs and several eastern cultures. 
This post will focus on the Chinese version of the Moon Rabbit, also known as the Jade Rabbit.

In Chinese folklore we follow three immortals who reincarnated themselves into three poor old people. They begged for food from a fox, a monkey and a rabbit. The fox and monkey both gave food to the immortals. 
When they approached the rabbit, the rabbit told them that he didn’t have any food. Instead the rabbit told them: “you can eat me” and jumped into the fire. The immortals were so moved by the rabbit’s actions and sent it to the moon to become an immortal jade rabbit. 
Ever since, the jade rabbit stayed in the Moon Palace to accompany the Moon goodness Chang’E and produced immortal medicine for those who live in heaven.

The Moon rabbit is not only a folklore tale in Asia. The America’s also have stories in regards to the rabbit who lives in the moon. Here is the story of the Moon Rabbit according to the Aztecs.

Quetzalcoatl, the Aztec god of wind and learning went to earth to live as a man for a period of time. As a human he went on a long journey on foot and after some time he became very tired and hungry. He didn’t find any water or food and he started to starve.
A rabbit then found the man. After first giving grass to the starving old man, the rabbit then offered herself as food to save his life. Touched by the kindness of the rabbit, the man gently picked him up, and revealing his true form as the feathered serpent God. Quetzalcoatl brought the rabbit up to the sky, all the way up to the moon, where the image of the rabbit was printed onto the surface of the moon.
As he did this, Quetzalcoatl told the rabbit he was no longer just a small creature, that his portrait painted in the light of the moon would forever tell the story of his kindness to all men.
#AztecMoonRabbit #MoonRabbit #RabbitFolklore #Rabbit #Aztec #Quetzalcoatl #Mexico #Japan #Korea #月兔 #中秋節 #Rabbitzodiac #RabbitsInReligion #China #Taiwan #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #trivia

The Moon rabbit is not only a folklore tale in Asia. The America’s also have stories in regards to the rabbit who lives in the moon. Here is the story of the Moon Rabbit according to the Aztecs.

Quetzalcoatl, the Aztec god of wind and learning went to earth to live as a man for a period of time. As a human he went on a long journey on foot and after some time he became very tired and hungry. He didn’t find any water or food and he started to starve. 
A rabbit then found the man. After first giving grass to the starving old man, the rabbit then offered herself as food to save his life. Touched by the kindness of the rabbit, the man gently picked him up, and revealing his true form as the feathered serpent God. Quetzalcoatl brought the rabbit up to the sky, all the way up to the moon, where the image of the rabbit was printed onto the surface of the moon. 
As he did this, Quetzalcoatl told the rabbit he was no longer just a small creature, that his portrait painted in the light of the moon would forever tell the story of his kindness to all men.

This weekend I went to Yilan (a city on the north eastern coast of Taiwan). In Yilan (or Ilan) I visited a pencil factory. Why? Because the name of the factory is Rabbit Pencil Factory!

Rabbit Pencil Factory is an important manufacturer of stationery in Taiwan, and was actually the first company to produce ballpoint pens in the country. As a result of trade liberalization, most pencil factories in Taiwan have now moved their production lines to China to take advantage of a larger market and cheaper labor. But instead of following this trend, Rabbit Pencil Factory has chosen to stay in Yilan.
I’m happy to say that I bought a couple of traditional Rabbit ballpoint pens which I will use at work.

#RabbitPencilFactory #Pens #Pencils #Education #Rabbit #兔 #School #Stationery #Yilan #Taiwan #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

This weekend I went to Yilan (a city on the north eastern coast of Taiwan). In Yilan (or Ilan) I visited a pencil factory. Why? Because the name of the factory is Rabbit Pencil Factory!

Rabbit Pencil Factory is an important manufacturer of stationery in Taiwan, and was actually the first company to produce ballpoint pens in the country. As a result of trade liberalization, most pencil factories in Taiwan have now moved their production lines to China to take advantage of a larger market and cheaper labor. But instead of following this trend, Rabbit Pencil Factory has chosen to stay in Yilan. 
I’m happy to say that I bought a couple of traditional Rabbit ballpoint pens which I will use at work.

In preparation for Christmas I recently saw a cult “funny bad” movie, called Santa and the Ice Cream Bunny.
With an impressive! 1,3/10 score on IMDb, I was compelled to see how this rabbit was portrayed in this 1972 film.

The plot is about Santa getting stuck on the beach in Florida with his sleigh. For some reason Santa cannot leave his sleigh, and needs help from kids which he summons through telekinesis?? The kids try to pull out the sleigh with the help of several animals, but the only animal that succeeds is a white rabbit in a fire truck called the Ice Cream Rabbit. Not sure he is called the Ice Cream Rabbit though, he didn’t have any ice cream. Also, the rabbit didn’t show up until the last 5 min of the approx 90min fantasy musical.
You can see the whole train wreck for yourselves here:
https://archive.org/details/SantaAndTheIceCreamBunny1972FullFilm

Merry Christmas everyone!

#IceCreamBunny #Christmas #Santa #70’s #Movies #BadMovies #FunnyBad #CultMovie #RabbitFolklore #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsInReligion #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

In preparation for Christmas I recently saw a cult “funny bad” movie, called Santa and the Ice Cream Bunny. 
With an impressive! 1,3/10 score on IMDb, I was compelled to see how this rabbit was portrayed in this 1972 film.

The plot is about Santa getting stuck on the beach in Florida with his sleigh. For some reason Santa cannot leave his sleigh, and needs help from kids which he summons through telekinesis?? The kids try to pull out the sleigh with the help of several animals, but the only animal that succeeds is a white rabbit in a fire truck called the Ice Cream Rabbit. Not sure he is called the Ice Cream Rabbit though, he didn’t have any ice cream. Also, the rabbit didn’t show up until the last 5 min of the approx 90min fantasy musical.  
You can see the whole train wreck for yourselves here: 
https://archive.org/details/SantaAndTheIceCreamBunny1972FullFilm

Merry Christmas everyone!

#70’s

During the Christmas holidays, I went to an art exhibition at Konsthall Märsta that celebrated the work of Shaun Tan, an Australian artist, writer and film maker.
Rabbits are often portrayed in his body of work so naturally I went to see the lithographs and movies that were on display in the gallery.
Shaun’s style is wonderfully bizarre and imaginative. It is sometimes surreal, yet it has always has a sympathetic quality. It feels like a mix that you have gotten if you would have mixed René Magritte and Michael Sowa with Tim Burton. Artistic characteristics that resonate with me.

If you are interested in seeing more, go and visit the exhibition @konsthall_marsta or pick the up the book “The Rabbits” that Shaun co-wrote together with John Marsden.

#ShaunTan #Art #JohnMarsden #Magritte #MichaelSowa #TimBurton #ChildrensBooks #Books #RabbitsInArt #Rabbit #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

During the Christmas holidays, I went to an art exhibition at Konsthall Märsta that celebrated the work of Shaun Tan, an Australian artist, writer and film maker. 
Rabbits are often portrayed in his body of work so naturally I went to see the lithographs and movies that were on display in the gallery. 
Shaun’s style is wonderfully bizarre and imaginative. It is sometimes surreal, yet it has always has a sympathetic quality. It feels like a mix that you have gotten if you would have mixed René Magritte and Michael Sowa with Tim Burton. Artistic characteristics that resonate with me.

If you are interested in seeing more, go and visit the exhibition @konsthall_marsta or pick the up the book “The Rabbits” that Shaun co-wrote together with John Marsden.

Today I had brunch at Rabbit Rabbit+, a brunch chain in Taiwan. Next to the rabbit-themed restaurant, I saw a store called Rabbit House. It is a store that sells only rabbit decorations and paraphernalia. They also had a couple of store rabbits that you could pet. Very nice place!

When I paid the things I wanted to buy, the sales clerk asked if I wanted to draw a raffle ticket. With the ticket I drew from the tombola, I won a red envelope.
These red envelopes are common in Taiwan as they are used for giving money as a gift. You basically put money in the envelopes and give to your relatives and friends as a gift during holidays or special occasions such as weddings or graduations. They are called 紅包(hóngbāo) in Mandarin.

#RabbitHouse #RabbitRabbit+ #RabbitShopping #Rabbit #紅包 #hóngbāo #兔 #Brunch #Zhongli #Taiwan #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

Today I had brunch at Rabbit Rabbit+, a brunch chain in Taiwan. Next to the rabbit-themed restaurant, I saw a store called Rabbit House. It is a store that sells only rabbit decorations and paraphernalia. They also had a couple of store rabbits that you could pet. Very nice place!

When I paid the things I wanted to buy, the sales clerk asked if I wanted to draw a raffle ticket. With the ticket I drew from the tombola, I won a red envelope. 
These red envelopes are common in Taiwan as they are used for giving money as a gift. You basically put money in the envelopes and give to your relatives and friends as a gift during holidays or special occasions such as weddings or graduations. They are called 紅包(hóngbāo) in Mandarin.

#RabbitRabbit+

Here in Taiwan, there is a great bookstore chain called Eslite. The stores are very sophisticated and they all have a debonair feel to them.

When looking through their greeting card selection, I saw cards from one of my favorite artists: Michael Sowa.
Sowa is a german artist who mainly paints variously whimsical, surreal motifs with animals. Among many of his paintings you will see…a lot of rabbits . One of my favorite books: Esterhazy, The Rabbit Prince by Irene Dische and Hans M. Enzensberger was actually illustrated by Sowa.

In the abovementioned book, the reader gets to meet Esterhazy, an Austrian rabbit prince who travels to Berlin to find a wife. It is an extraordinary story that takes place around the fall of the Berlin wall. I recommend checking it out, and, of course, the rest of Sowa’s work.

#MichaelSowa #RabbitsInArt #Rabbit #Surreal #兔 #Eslite #Taiwan #IreneDische #HansEnzensberger #RabbitsInBooks #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

Here in Taiwan, there is a great bookstore chain called Eslite. The stores are very sophisticated and they all have a debonair feel to them.

When looking through their greeting card selection, I saw cards from one of my favorite artists: Michael Sowa. 
Sowa is a german artist who mainly paints variously whimsical, surreal motifs with animals. Among many of his paintings you will see...a lot of rabbits . One of my favorite books: Esterhazy, The Rabbit Prince by Irene Dische and Hans M. Enzensberger was actually illustrated by Sowa.

In the abovementioned book, the reader gets to meet Esterhazy, an Austrian rabbit prince who travels to Berlin to find a wife. It is an extraordinary story that takes place around the fall of the Berlin wall. I recommend checking it out, and, of course, the rest of Sowa's work.

During my stay in Kuala Lumpur I ate at The Rabbit Hole, an alfresco restaurant in the lively Changcat Bukit Bintang area. A tasty platter of Nasi Lemak and a couple of Tiger beers were consumed throughout the evening.

As for trivia, the restaurant was inspired by the white rabbit in Alice in Wonderland.
#TheRabbitHole #RabbitRestaurant #Rabbit #Restaurants #兔 #Malaysia #NasiLemak #BukitBintang #KualaLumpur #RabbitsAndFood #Rabbits #Trivia

During my stay in Kuala Lumpur I ate at The Rabbit Hole, an alfresco restaurant in the lively Changcat Bukit Bintang area. A tasty platter of Nasi Lemak and a couple of Tiger beers were consumed throughout the evening.

As for trivia, the restaurant was inspired by the white rabbit in Alice in Wonderland.

At the Pier-2 art center in Kaohsiung, I saw this mural depicting different animals surfing. In the middle you can see a rabbit surfing. Very neat!

This led me to search online for connections between surfers and rabbits. To both my suprisement and amusement, I read that the one of the original innovators of modern surfing was named Albert “Rabbit” Kekai. The Honoluu-born American was a professional surfer during the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s. His skills as a surfer not only won him prestigious competitions, it also served beneficial in war efforts against Japan in WW2. ”Rabbit” worked on the Underwater Demolition Teams, that operated in the Pacific Theatre deploying depth charges to destroy Japanese ships.

Another ”Rabbit” surfer is the Australian professional surfer Wayne ”Rabbit” Bartholomew which is considered the 13th best surfer of all time according to Surfer Magazine.

#RabbitSurfer #AlbertKekai #WayneBartholomew #RabbitsInArt #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitKekai #Pier2ArtCenter #Kaohsiung #Taiwan #RabbitsAndSports #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

At the Pier-2 art center in Kaohsiung, I saw this mural depicting different animals surfing. In the middle you can see a rabbit surfing. Very neat!

This led me to search online for connections between surfers and rabbits. To both my suprisement and amusement, I read that the one of the original innovators of modern surfing was named Albert "Rabbit" Kekai. The Honoluu-born American was a professional surfer during the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s. His skills as a surfer not only won him prestigious competitions, it also served beneficial in war efforts against Japan in WW2. ”Rabbit” worked on the Underwater Demolition Teams, that operated in the Pacific Theatre deploying depth charges to destroy Japanese ships.

Another ”Rabbit” surfer is the Australian professional surfer Wayne ”Rabbit” Bartholomew which is considered the 13th best surfer of all time according to Surfer Magazine.

Because today is Easter Day, let’s highlight one of the most beloved folklore figures of all time, the Easter Bunny.

The Easter bunny (or Easter Hare) is a figure that often travels with a basket of colored eggs to hand out to Children. The character is a major symbol for Easter, at least in Western countries, but where does the story of mythical rabbit come from?

The Easter Bunny was first popularized as a symbol of the season by the German Protestants. It is likely they were the ones to invent the myth of the Easter Bunny for their children. Even in earliest folklore, the Easter Bunny came as a judge, hiding decorated eggs for well-behaved children.

The story of the OsterHase (The Easter Bunny) followed German immigrants to the American colonies in the 18th century and the folklore spread across the United States.

Some say that the origins of the Easter Bunny comes from pagan traditions i.e. the Saxon Goddess Eostre, whilst other say it comes from the Christian notion that rabbits were associated with the Virgin Mary, and with the season itself.

In any case, Happy Easter everyone!

#EasterBunny #Christianity #RabbitsInArt #Rabbit #兔 #Easter #Pagan #OsterHase #German #Saxon #TheVirginMary #Eostre #Religion #RabbitsAndReligion #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

Because today is Easter Day, let’s highlight one of the most beloved folklore figures of all time, the Easter Bunny.

The Easter bunny (or Easter Hare) is a figure that often travels with a basket of colored eggs to hand out to Children. The character is a major symbol for Easter, at least in Western countries, but where does the story of mythical rabbit come from?

The Easter Bunny was first popularized as a symbol of the season by the German Protestants. It is likely they were the ones to invent the myth of the Easter Bunny for their children. Even in earliest folklore, the Easter Bunny came as a judge, hiding decorated eggs for well-behaved children.

The story of the OsterHase (The Easter Bunny) followed German immigrants to the American colonies in the 18th century and the folklore spread across the United States.

Some say that the origins of the Easter Bunny comes from pagan traditions i.e. the Saxon Goddess Eostre, whilst other say it comes from the Christian notion that rabbits were associated with the Virgin Mary, and with the season itself.

In any case, Happy Easter everyone!

Last weekend I met up with a friend in Bangkok, a city that is so congested with cars, mopeds and tuktuks everywhere so that you are better off taking the metro or skytrain. As in many other cities, Bangkok also uses plastic top-up smart cards that you can use to pay for the public transportation. Whereas the cards are called the Oyster card in London, and the Octopus card in Hongkong, Bangkok has ignored the aquatic animal theme, and has wisely enough chosen the name ”Rabbit Card” for their payment system.

Besides using it for public transportation, you can, of course, use it to pay in payment at convenience stores, supermarkets, restaurants, cinemas, and vending machines.

Bonus trivia: the Thai word for rabbit is: กระต่าย (Krat̀āy)
#RabbitCard #Rabbit #Rabbit #兔 #Krat̀āy #กระต่าย #Thailand #Bangkok #PublicTransport #Rabbits #Trivia

Last weekend I met up with a friend in Bangkok, a city that is so congested with cars, mopeds and tuktuks everywhere so that you are better off taking the metro or skytrain. As in many other cities, Bangkok also uses plastic top-up smart cards that you can use to pay for the public transportation. Whereas the cards are called the Oyster card in London, and the Octopus card in Hongkong, Bangkok has ignored the aquatic animal theme, and has wisely enough chosen the name ”Rabbit Card” for their payment system. 

Besides using it for public transportation, you can, of course, use it to pay in payment at convenience stores, supermarkets, restaurants, cinemas, and vending machines.

Bonus trivia: the Thai word for rabbit is: กระต่าย (Krat̀āy) 
 #Krat̀āy #กระต่าย

Earlier this year, a new reimagined adaptation of Peter Rabbit went up on the silver screen. When I first saw the trailers for it, I was quite worried that Columbia Pictures under the helm of writer and director Will Gluck would destroy the legacy of the delicate and and finely tuned stories of Beatrix Potter.
Fortunately enough, my worries were unfounded. Sure, the movie is not as elegant as the early 20th century source material, but you couldn’t really do that type of movie today I think, at least not for general movie going audiences.
I think the movie pays fair enough tribute to the traditional story of Peter Rabbit and captures the essence of his character, namely the fact that he’s a curious and somewhat imprudent young rabbit that gets into trouble.

The new story is continuation of the original Peter Rabbit story, and I must say it did have heart. It is humorous and and showed rabbits in the way I like them to be portrayed, as curious and fearless.
Since Peter Rabbit is the most famous fictional rabbit there is, with the possible exception of Bugs Bunny, I will discuss the classical Peter Rabbit in another post later.

In any case, check out the Peter Rabbit movie if you can. Even though it looks cute, it is not only a children’s movie, it is equally much enjoyable as an adult.

#PeterRabbitMovie #PeterRabbit #BeatrixPotter #WillGluck #RabbitsInMovies #RabbitsInArt #Rabbit #兔 #Brittish #Books #RabbitsAndLitterature #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

Earlier this year, a new reimagined adaptation of Peter Rabbit went up on the silver screen. When I first saw the trailers for it, I was quite worried that Columbia Pictures under the helm of writer and director Will Gluck would destroy the legacy of the delicate and and finely tuned stories of Beatrix Potter. 
Fortunately enough, my worries were unfounded. Sure, the movie is not as elegant as the early 20th century source material, but you couldn’t really do that type of movie today I think, at least not for general movie going audiences. 
I think the movie pays fair enough tribute to the traditional story of Peter Rabbit and captures the essence of his character, namely the fact that he’s a curious and somewhat imprudent young rabbit that gets into trouble.

The new story is continuation of the original Peter Rabbit story, and I must say it did have heart. It is humorous and and showed rabbits in the way I like them to be portrayed, as curious and fearless. 
Since Peter Rabbit is the most famous fictional rabbit there is, with the possible exception of Bugs Bunny, I will discuss the classical Peter Rabbit in another post later.

In any case, check out the Peter Rabbit movie if you can. Even though it looks cute, it is not only a children’s movie, it is equally much enjoyable as an adult.

As a continuation to the last post in I which talked about the reimagined CGI/live action version of Peter Rabbit, I wanted to address the source material, which was introduced to the public through The tale of Peter Rabbit, the book that jolted Beatrix Potter into celebrity status as well made her a rich children’s book author.

The Tale of Peter Rabbit follows the mischievous young rabbit Peter who lives with his mother and his three smaller sisters. Peter is disobedient and reckless and he enters the vegetable garden of a man named Mr. McGregor even though his father had been killed in the same garden by Mr McGregor and turned into a pie by Mrs. McGregor.
As the story unfolds Peter, of course, is discovered by Mr McGregor and almost faces the same fate as his father. It is classic children’s tale with a clear morale.

Even though Beatrix Potter’s story of the feisty rabbit with the blue jacket was rejected by numerous publishers, she finally got it published in 1902, and it became an instant success. In fact, the Tale of Peter Rabbit has been translated into 36 languages, and with 45 million copies sold it is one of the best-selling books of all time.
The success of course spawned several sequels, for instance the The tale of Benjamin Bunny, Peter’s cousin, and countless adaptations and tons of merchandise. As a matter of fact, Beatrix Potter was a very clever business woman, and when she understood that she had a success on her hands, she made a lot of Peter Rabbit toys to accompany the books. Nowadays, it is commonplace, but in the beginning of the last century, it was uncommon.
Finally, if you think a book that has sold 45 million copies must be the most sold book featuring a rabbit, you are wrong. Watership Down has sold 50 million copies and that novel was written 70 years after Peter Rabbit’s published appearance. Richard Adam’s portrayal of the rabbits that need to find a new home will also addressed in a later post.
#PeterRabbit #BenjaminBunny #BeatrixPotter #RabbitsInMovies #RabbitsInArt #Rabbit #兔 #Brittish #Books #RabbitsAndLitterature #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

As a continuation to the last post in I which talked about the reimagined CGI/live action version of Peter Rabbit, I wanted to address the source material, which was introduced to the public through The tale of Peter Rabbit, the book that jolted Beatrix Potter into celebrity status as well made her a rich children’s book author.

The Tale of Peter Rabbit follows the mischievous young rabbit Peter who lives with his mother and his three smaller sisters. Peter is disobedient and reckless and he enters the vegetable garden of a man named Mr. McGregor even though his father had been killed in the same garden by Mr McGregor and turned into a pie by Mrs. McGregor. 
As the story unfolds Peter, of course, is discovered by Mr McGregor and almost faces the same fate as his father. It is classic children’s tale with a clear morale.

Even though Beatrix Potter’s story of the feisty rabbit with the blue jacket was rejected by numerous publishers, she finally got it published in 1902, and it became an instant success. In fact, the Tale of Peter Rabbit has been translated into 36 languages, and with 45 million copies sold it is one of the best-selling books of all time. 
The success of course spawned several sequels, for instance the The tale of Benjamin Bunny, Peter’s cousin, and countless adaptations and tons of merchandise. As a matter of fact, Beatrix Potter was a very clever business woman, and when she understood that she had a success on her hands, she made a lot of Peter Rabbit toys to accompany the books. Nowadays, it is commonplace, but in the beginning of the last century, it was uncommon. 
Finally, if you think a book that has sold 45 million copies must be the most sold book featuring a rabbit, you are wrong. Watership Down has sold 50 million copies and that novel was written 70 years after Peter Rabbit’s published appearance. Richard Adam’s portrayal of the rabbits that need to find a new home will also addressed in a later post.

Recently I went to a very interesting rabbit-themed concert here in Taipei with the Danish artist Sleep Party People.
Although it is said to be a one-man show created by musician Brian Batz, the gig consisted of several band members all dressed with white rabbit masks.
The group played dreamlike synth-electronic music, and it didn’t surprise me that the music genre most connected to the dreamy rabbits was called Dream Pop. It reminded me a lot of David Lynch’s music and funny enough, it seems like Brian was influenced by David Lynch.
The gig was very cool and I recommend anyone to go to and see these neo-psychedelic rabbits live.
#SleepPartyPeople #BrianBatz #Taipei #Huashan1914 #DeamPop #RabbitsInMusic #RabbitsInArt #Rabbit #兔 #Danish #Music #RabbitsAndMusic #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

Recently I went to a very interesting rabbit-themed concert here in Taipei with the Danish artist Sleep Party People. 
Although it is said to be a one-man show created by musician Brian Batz, the gig consisted of several band members all dressed with white rabbit masks. 
The group played dreamlike synth-electronic music, and it didn’t surprise me that the music genre most connected to the dreamy rabbits was called Dream Pop. It reminded me a lot of David Lynch’s music and funny enough, it seems like Brian was influenced by David Lynch. 
The gig was very cool and I recommend anyone to go to and see these neo-psychedelic rabbits live.

There is a small village called Rabbit’s hole hamlet in the mountains outside of Taoyuan in Taiwan. In this little village, there is a distillery that produces an assortment of spirits like this vodka; Spring Vodka.

As you can see on the label, this company has done their marketing correctly, their logo is a sophisticated rabbit wearing an 18th century ruffled poet shirt. No wonder they were awarded the Silver Medal in San Francisco World Spirits Competition in 2017.
Check out Spring Vodka’s Instagram account @springvodka
#SpringVodka #spirits #Taipei #Taoyuan #vodka #RabbitsAndBooze #Rabbit #兔 #Taiwan #VodkaNeat #RabbitsInCulture #cocktails #Rabbits #Trivia

There is a small village called Rabbit’s hole hamlet in the mountains outside of Taoyuan in Taiwan. In this little village, there is a distillery that produces an assortment of spirits like this vodka; Spring Vodka.

As you can see on the label, this company has done their marketing correctly, their logo is a sophisticated rabbit wearing an 18th century ruffled poet shirt. No wonder they were awarded the Silver Medal in San Francisco World Spirits Competition in 2017. 
Check out Spring Vodka’s Instagram account @springvodka

Starting my vacation by opening a Sauvignon Blanc called Rabbit Island.
The New Zealand winery behind this nice fruity wine is located on a small island in the Tasman bay on the northern tip of the southern island of New Zealand.

Rabbit island, or Moturoa is with its long, safe swimming beach is a popular beach resort and this beautiful recreational area became a public reserve in 1908.

Apparently, the Rabbit Island has earthy soil well suited to deep rooting crops such as grapes as there is little or no clay pan. Therefore, the Rabbit Island vineyard grows grape varieties like Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir.

So, in the midst of this heat wave hitting most of the northern hemisphere, cool yourself down with a glass of Rabbit Island wine.

#RabbitIslandWine #Moturoa #TasmanBay #Nelson #Wine #WhiteWine #SauvignonBlanc #RabbitWine #RabbitsAndBooze #Rabbit #兔 #NewZealand #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

Starting my vacation by opening a Sauvignon Blanc called Rabbit Island. 
The New Zealand winery behind this nice fruity wine is located on a small island in the Tasman bay on the northern tip of the southern island of New Zealand.

Rabbit island, or Moturoa is with its long, safe swimming beach is a popular beach resort and this beautiful recreational area became a public reserve in 1908.

Apparently, the Rabbit Island has earthy soil well suited to deep rooting crops such as grapes as there is little or no clay pan. Therefore, the Rabbit Island vineyard grows grape varieties like Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Pinot Gris and Pinot Noir.

So, in the midst of this heat wave hitting most of the northern hemisphere, cool yourself down with a glass of Rabbit Island wine.

On my quest to find and promulgate rabbit influence my wife and I went to Burning Man in the Nevada Desert. I wanted to see if the week-long creative playground that is Burning Man had some rabbits to share.

I was content to see that rabbit influence had seeped into Burning Man in many ways, not only were many people dressed as rabbits. Our long-eared friends were also present among the of hundreds of events, camps, bars and art installations all across Black Rock City (The name of the society built around Burning Man). As for other forms of rabbit influence, I can mention that Burning Man’s newsletter is called ”The Jackrabbit speaks”. As for my own rabbit contribution, I went as a navy officer with rabbit ears one night.

#BurningMan2018 #BurningMan #RabbitsInCulture #RabbitsInArt #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsAndMusic #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

On my quest to find and promulgate rabbit influence my wife and I went to Burning Man in the Nevada Desert. I wanted to see if the week-long creative playground that is Burning Man had some rabbits to share.

I was content to see that rabbit influence had seeped into Burning Man in many ways, not only were many people dressed as rabbits. Our long-eared friends were also present among the of hundreds of events, camps, bars and art installations all across Black Rock City (The name of the society built around Burning Man). As for other forms of rabbit influence, I can mention that Burning Man’s newsletter is called ”The Jackrabbit speaks”. As for my own rabbit contribution, I went as a navy officer with rabbit ears one night.

A few days days before I went to Burning Man I ”hopped” into the Bunny Museum in Pasadena.
The Bunny museum holds the worlds largest collection of rabbit items and memorabilia, over 35 000 items. It also has a library that aims to summarize rabbit influence whether it is in art, culture, advertising, film, literature or even wartime propaganda.
The museum was co-founded by married couple Candace Frazee and Steve Lubanski, who started collecting the items after they began a tradition (on their first date) of giving each other new rabbit gifts every day.

You can read more about this quirky place at https://www.thebunnymuseum.com

#TheBunnyMuseum #Pasadena #RabbitMuseum #RabbitsInCulture #RabbitsInArt #Rabbit #兔 #rabbitsofinstagram #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

A few days days before I went to Burning Man I ”hopped” into the Bunny Museum in Pasadena. 
The Bunny museum holds the worlds largest collection of rabbit items and memorabilia, over 35 000 items. It also has a library that aims to summarize rabbit influence whether it is in art, culture, advertising, film, literature or even wartime propaganda. 
The museum was co-founded by married couple Candace Frazee and Steve Lubanski, who started collecting the items after they began a tradition (on their first date) of giving each other new rabbit gifts every day.

You can read more about this quirky place at https://www.thebunnymuseum.com

In Taiwan, most people use a Japanese instant messing app called Line. Like many other similar services, you can chat with friends using text, video and audio, as well as conduct free VoIP conversations and video conferences. Additionally Line is also a platform providing various services including a digital wallet, news, video on demand, and digital comics.
All of these technical features are, of course, dwarfed by the fact that Line has a Rabbit mascot called Cony. Cony is part of LineFriends, a group of characters that were at first just meant to be funny stickers that you could add when you are chatting, but grew quickly in popularity so that they received story-adaptions in two separate anime tv-series from Japan.

In LineOffline, the story revolves around a number of office workers at Line, a phone company where Cony is a bad-tempered rabbit that wants to loose weight. In her ill tempered manner, she punches her co-workers, particularly often the alien character Moon. However she is very kind and gentle to her husband Brown who is a bear.

#LineFriends #Cony #Line #Taiwan #RabbitsAndApps #Korea #Anime #RabbitsInCulture #RabbitCartoon #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsAndMusic #Rabbits #Trivia

In Taiwan, most people use a Japanese instant messing app called Line. Like many other similar services, you can chat with friends using text, video and audio, as well as conduct free VoIP conversations and video conferences. Additionally Line is also a platform providing various services including a digital wallet, news, video on demand, and digital comics. 
All of these technical features are, of course, dwarfed by the fact that Line has a Rabbit mascot called Cony. Cony is part of LineFriends, a group of characters that were at first just meant to be funny stickers that you could add when you are chatting, but grew quickly in popularity so that they received story-adaptions in two separate anime tv-series from Japan.

In LineOffline, the story revolves around a number of office workers at Line, a phone company where Cony is a bad-tempered rabbit that wants to loose weight. In her ill tempered manner, she punches her co-workers, particularly often the alien character Moon. However she is very kind and gentle to her husband Brown who is a bear.

For the longest time, I was thinking of writing a post about Watership Down, the rabbit Magnum opus written by British author Richard Adams.
When In 2016, I read that Watership Down was going to be adapted into a mini-series, I figured I would wait to post until I had seen it. It has now been released on Netflix, I encourage everyone to see it.

Similar to the 1978 animated film, this new CGI version follows the original 1972 novel quite well. The story revolves around a band of brave rabbits that search for a new home because one of the rabbits, Fiver, a so-called ”seer”, (a psychic rabbit), manages to convince his brother Hazel that their current home will soon be destroyed by humans.

Fiver and Hazel go on a perilous Homeric odyssey together with a number of other rabbits, like the guard rabbit Bigwig. On their journey which they encounter the mysterious rabbit Cowslip’s ”Soylent Green” dystopian warren and most importantly the totalitarian Rabbit state run by the main antagonist General Woundwort.

Richard Adams’ Watership Down does not only tell a suspenseful story, but it also establishes a very interesting rabbit mythology and language, similar to what Tolkien did for the Lord of the rings.

The rabbits depicted in Watership Down speak Lapine, and they follow a monotheistic religion, where ”Frith” is seen as the sole lord.
As of 2017, Watership Down has sold 50 million copies. This makes this rabbit tale one of the most read books of all time.

Just go and read it! And watch the Netflix miniseries!
#WatershipDown #Netflix #RichardAdams #RabbitsinTVseries #RabbitsInMovies #RabbitsInArt #Rabbit #兔 #Brittish #Books #RabbitsAndLitterature #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

For the longest time, I was thinking of writing a post about Watership Down, the rabbit Magnum opus written by British author Richard Adams. 
When In 2016, I read that Watership Down was going to be adapted into a mini-series, I figured I would wait to post until I had seen it. It has now been released on Netflix, I encourage everyone to see it.

Similar to the 1978 animated film, this new CGI version follows the original 1972 novel quite well. The story revolves around a band of brave rabbits that search for a new home because one of the rabbits, Fiver, a so-called ”seer”, (a psychic rabbit), manages to convince his brother Hazel that their current home will soon be destroyed by humans.

Fiver and Hazel go on a perilous Homeric odyssey together with a number of other rabbits, like the guard rabbit Bigwig. On their journey which they encounter the mysterious rabbit Cowslip’s ”Soylent Green” dystopian warren and most importantly the totalitarian Rabbit state run by the main antagonist General Woundwort.

Richard Adams’ Watership Down does not only tell a suspenseful story, but it also establishes a very interesting rabbit mythology and language, similar to what Tolkien did for the Lord of the rings.

The rabbits depicted in Watership Down speak Lapine, and they follow a monotheistic religion, where ”Frith” is seen as the sole lord. 
As of 2017, Watership Down has sold 50 million copies. This makes this rabbit tale one of the most read books of all time.

Just go and read it! And watch the Netflix miniseries!

After seeing the beguiling mess that was Velvet Buzzsaw, I was thinking about its redeeming quality, which was Jake Gyllenhaal’s performance as the inflated art critic Morf. That led to think about one of Gyllenhaal’s other good performances, which is, of course, his portrayal of troubled teenager Donnie Darko in the 2001 film with same name.

Donnie Darko is an American sci-fi movie in which the main character Donnie meets a monstrous rabbit that tells him that the world is going to end in 28 days.

Since the movie was released in the early noughties, it has gained a cult following because of its great combination of “coming-of-age”, surrealism, sci-fi and intriguing characters, where one should mention the late Patrick Swayze for playing a very creepy character.
The iconic design of Frank, the rabbit who “haunts” Donnie has since the movie came out become a cult Halloween costume similar to the Anonymous mask from V for Vendetta.
Be sure to check out Donnie Darko, but stay away from director Richard Kelly’s 2009 movie, The Box, that movie sucks.

#DonnieDarko #RichardKelly #JakeGyllenhaal #RabbitsInMovies #RabbitsInArt #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

After seeing the beguiling mess that was Velvet Buzzsaw, I was thinking about its redeeming quality, which was Jake Gyllenhaal’s performance as the inflated art critic Morf. That led to think about one of Gyllenhaal’s other good performances, which is, of course, his portrayal of troubled teenager Donnie Darko in the 2001 film with same name.

Donnie Darko is an American sci-fi movie in which the main character Donnie meets a monstrous rabbit that tells him that the world is going to end in 28 days.

Since the movie was released in the early noughties, it has gained a cult following because of its great combination of “coming-of-age”, surrealism, sci-fi and intriguing characters, where one should mention the late Patrick Swayze for playing a very creepy character. 
The iconic design of Frank, the rabbit who “haunts” Donnie has since the movie came out become a cult Halloween costume similar to the Anonymous mask from V for Vendetta. 
Be sure to check out Donnie Darko, but stay away from director Richard Kelly’s 2009 movie, The Box, that movie sucks.

During the long weekend, I visited National Taiwan Museum, where I saw the exhibition “Discovering Taiwan: Re-visiting the Age of Natural History and Naturalist of Taiwan”. At the exhibition I saw a taxidermy of an endemic rabbit species to Taiwan, the Formosan Hare.

The Formosan Hare is smaller and more slender relative to the European hare. It seems it has shorter ears than its relatives in Europe, and in the Americas.

The Latin name is Lepus sinensis formosus.

#FormosanHare #Taiwan #Ecology #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

During the long weekend, I visited National Taiwan Museum, where I saw the exhibition “Discovering Taiwan: Re-visiting the Age of Natural History and Naturalist of Taiwan”. At the exhibition I saw a taxidermy of an endemic rabbit species to Taiwan, the Formosan Hare.

The Formosan Hare is smaller and more slender relative to the European hare. It seems it has shorter ears than its relatives in Europe, and in the Americas.

The Latin name is Lepus sinensis formosus.

When out strolling around I saw this mural of a rabbit standing on a moon-like surface. That reminded me of the Chinese mobile space rover named Jade Rabbit that landed on the far side of the moon on January 3rd, the first time by any nation.

Jade Rabbit 2 will collect scientific data to help scientists learn more about the early conditions of the Solar System.

Besides collecting the info mentioned above, China is also doing some reconnaissance and developing the technologies required for a crewed mission to the moon. Beijing has made it known that it would like to eventually build a base on the lunar surface.

The lunar rover Jade Rabbit 2 and its Chang’e 4 lander are the second rabbit-themed Chinese space craft landing on the moon, following the Jade Rabbit 1 that landed in 2013.
#JadeRabbit #China #SpaceExploration #Moon #Chang’e #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #trivia

When out strolling around I saw this mural of a rabbit standing on a moon-like surface. That reminded me of the Chinese mobile space rover named Jade Rabbit that landed on the far side of the moon on January 3rd, the first time by any nation.

Jade Rabbit 2 will collect scientific data to help scientists learn more about the early conditions of the Solar System.

Besides collecting the info mentioned above, China is also doing some reconnaissance and developing the technologies required for a crewed mission to the moon. Beijing has made it known that it would like to eventually build a base on the lunar surface.

The lunar rover Jade Rabbit 2 and its Chang'e 4 lander are the second rabbit-themed Chinese space craft landing on the moon, following the Jade Rabbit 1 that landed in 2013. 
#Chang’e

Last month, I went to Kyoto to see Japans’ famous Shinto, ZenBuddhistic, and Buddhistic temples and shrines.

Since Kyoto has over 1600 temples and shrines, and I only had 4 days to spare, it was imperative to find the most important shrines… The most important one was, of course , the Higashi Tenno Okazaki Shrine otherwise called “Usagi Shrine” or “Rabbit Shrine”. The Okazaki Shrine is dedicated to the mythical deities kami Susano-no-mikoto and Kushinadahime-no-mikoto and their three daughters and five sons.

The “usagi” (rabbits) are messengers for these deities and visitors of the shrine therefore come to pass their prayers and messages to the rabbits. Many times, women come here to pray for an easy childbirth.

This is because the shrine received additional imperial favor after the of the successful birth of a Japanese empress in 1178.

If you visit the Rabbit Shrine, (which you should), you also take the opportunity to buy rabbit lucky amulets, so called “Usagi Mikuji Omamori”. These amulets are meant for making wishes what you need to do is write down the date and contents of your wish and your name. You can also go to one of buildings called chozuya (a building for purifying your hands before praying), there is a statue of a black rabbit looking up at the moon. This rabbit is called “Kosazuke Usagi,” and it is customary to splash water on the statue and rub its belly before you make your wish.

Just go there!

#UsagiShrine #Japan #Kyoto #Shintoism #RabbitsAndReligion #HigashiTennoOkazakiShrine #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #trivia

Last month, I went to Kyoto to see Japans’ famous Shinto, ZenBuddhistic, and Buddhistic temples and shrines.

Since Kyoto has over 1600 temples and shrines, and I only had 4 days to spare, it was imperative to find the most important shrines... The most important one was, of course , the Higashi Tenno Okazaki Shrine otherwise called “Usagi Shrine” or “Rabbit Shrine”. The Okazaki Shrine is dedicated to the mythical deities kami Susano-no-mikoto and Kushinadahime-no-mikoto and their three daughters and five sons.

The "usagi" (rabbits) are messengers for these deities and visitors of the shrine therefore come to pass their prayers and messages to the rabbits. Many times, women come here to pray for an easy childbirth.

This is because the shrine received additional imperial favor after the of the successful birth of a Japanese empress in 1178.

If you visit the Rabbit Shrine, (which you should), you also take the opportunity to buy rabbit lucky amulets, so called "Usagi Mikuji Omamori". These amulets are meant for making wishes what you need to do is write down the date and contents of your wish and your name. You can also go to one of  buildings called chozuya (a building for purifying your hands before praying), there is a statue of a black rabbit looking up at the moon. This rabbit is called "Kosazuke Usagi," and it is customary to splash water on the statue and rub its belly before you make your wish.

Just go there!

This is Abraham, he is a rabbit that I met today in Montmatre Park or more colloquially ”Rabbit Park”. In southern Seoul, in the Gangnam district, there is a park named after the Montmartre district in Paris. In this park there is a small rabbit colony living freely and they are being taken care of by volunteers that give them food every day.
I met one of the care takers and she told me that the gray rabbit’s name was Abraham. Even though there are many park visitors with dogs, Abraham and his friends are safe. This is because the park has put up instructions to dog owners that they need to put their dogs in leach when they enter the park. Abraham and his friends also had wooden huts that they could relax in.
So, why is the park called Montmartre? Partly because it is located on a hill, just like the French original district, and also because it placed in Seorae Village (little France), home to the largest French population in South Korea.

Montmarte Park is a tribute to the friendship between South Korea and France, and everywhere you can read famous poems from artists that were active the in Montmarte artist circles around the late 1900s.

As a matter of fact, Montmarte has more rabbit connections than just Abraham. There is a famous cabaret theatre called Au Lapin Agile (the lively rabbit) in Montmarte, and one of the most famous characters in the post-impressionist period Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec made several lithographs with rabbits, the most famous one being La valse de lapins (The waltz of the rabbits). More about Au Lapin Agile and Toulouse-Lautrec in later posts.

#RabbitPark #SouthKorea #Seoul #France #MontmatrePark #Montmatre #RabbitsAndPoetry #ToulouseLautrec #Culture #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #trivia

This is Abraham, he is a rabbit that I met today in Montmatre Park or more colloquially ”Rabbit Park”. In southern Seoul, in the Gangnam district, there is a park named after the Montmartre district in Paris. In this park there is a small rabbit colony living freely and they are being taken care of by volunteers that give them food every day.
I met one of the care takers and she told me that the gray rabbit’s name was Abraham. Even though there are many park visitors with dogs, Abraham and his friends are safe. This is because the park has put up instructions to dog owners that they need to put their dogs in leach when they enter the park. Abraham and his friends also had wooden huts that they could relax in. 
So, why is the park called Montmartre? Partly because it is located on a hill, just like the French original district, and also because it placed in Seorae Village (little France), home to the largest French population in South Korea.

Montmarte Park is a tribute to the friendship between South Korea and France, and everywhere you can read famous poems from artists that were active the in Montmarte artist circles around the late 1900s.

As a matter of fact, Montmarte has more rabbit connections than just Abraham. There is a famous cabaret theatre called Au Lapin Agile (the lively rabbit) in Montmarte, and one of the most famous characters in the post-impressionist period Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec made several lithographs with rabbits, the most famous one being La valse de lapins (The waltz of the rabbits). More about Au Lapin Agile and Toulouse-Lautrec in later posts.

Yesterday I went to a bar that served a craft beer called Dalbit Pilsner.

This pilsner, made in the US exclusively for Korea, has (similar to Taiwanese Spring Vodka) also made its marketing correctly.
On the label you can see a rabbit wearing a space suit holding a beer. He is obviously traveling to the moon as depicted in the background. This is a nod to the moon rabbit that exist in certain folklores. I have written about this in previous posts.

The brewery behind this Rabbit pilsner is Lost Coast Brewery located in Eureka, California. The owner of the brewery is Barbara Groom, she is one of only a few prominent women in a traditionally male-dominated industry.

Before she became a brewery owner, Barbara was a pharmacist, I guess she swapped jobs with the astronaut rabbit who once he landed on the moon became the moon’s own pharmacist.

#DalbitPilsner #SouthKorea #Seoul #Pilsner #CaliforniaBeer #CraftBeer #Beer #RabbitsAndBooze #Culture #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #Trivia

Yesterday I went to a bar that served a craft beer called Dalbit Pilsner.

This pilsner, made in the US exclusively for Korea, has (similar to Taiwanese Spring Vodka) also made its marketing correctly. 
On the label you can see a rabbit wearing a space suit holding a beer. He is obviously traveling to the moon as depicted in the background. This is a nod to the moon rabbit that exist in certain folklores. I have written about this in previous posts.

The brewery behind this Rabbit pilsner is Lost Coast Brewery located in Eureka, California. The owner of the brewery is Barbara Groom, she is one of only a few prominent women in a traditionally male-dominated industry.

Before she became a brewery owner, Barbara was a pharmacist, I guess she swapped jobs with the astronaut rabbit who once he landed on the moon became the moon’s own pharmacist.

Two weeks ago I visited a digital art museum in Tokyo, called TeamLab Borderless (@teamlab_borderless ). This cool museum is an experimental place created by an ultra-technologist art collective TeamLab. This collective consists of architects, engineers, programmers, CG animators, mathematicians, musicians, and they are presenting sophisticated art installations where you as a visitor can interact with the art.

Among numerous very cool art installations, one work called Walk, Walk, Walk: Search, Deviate, Reunite specifically caught my attention.
This enchanting piece of art showed a parade of animals parading alongside many of the museum corridors. In this hallucinogenic march we found, of course, some rabbits that walked, jumped and danced apace with frogs, lions and Buddhist priests (I think) etc.

All in all, very cool stuff, head over to the island of Obaida and see for yourself.
#TeamLabBorderless #TeamLab #BorderlessWorld #ArtCollective #Japan #Tokyo #ArtInstallation #DigitalArt #Museum #RabbitsAndArt #Culture #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #trivia

Two weeks ago I visited a digital art museum in Tokyo, called TeamLab Borderless (@teamlab_borderless ). This cool museum is an experimental place created by an ultra-technologist art collective TeamLab. This collective consists of architects, engineers, programmers, CG animators, mathematicians, musicians, and they are presenting sophisticated art installations where you as a visitor can interact with the art.

Among numerous very cool art installations, one work called Walk, Walk, Walk: Search, Deviate, Reunite specifically caught my attention. 
This enchanting piece of art showed a parade of animals parading alongside many of the museum corridors. In this hallucinogenic march we found, of course, some rabbits that walked, jumped and danced apace with frogs, lions and Buddhist priests (I think) etc.

All in all, very cool stuff, head over to the island of Obaida and see for yourself.

When I visited the Gyeongbokgung Palace in Seoul I saw a rabbit statue from the Korean Zodiac. This was a similar statue, albeit much smaller, to the one I saw at the Sik Sik Yuen temple in HongKong.
Apparently the power of different animals were very important to the rulers of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1897) which is a defining period for Korean culture and identity. That is why the Gyeongbokgung Palace has a lot of figures of animals.
Each of the animals have their own special personality and symbolic meaning, and what they represent can be largely divided into five categories: the king’s authority and dignity, auspicious signs, the law and justice, lucky symbols and protection from evil spirits, and the universe.

As for the Rabbit, he is a lucky symbol signifying long life, peace and well-being, and happiness. The Rabbit is also one out of Twelve Earthly Branches that shows that the universe is a fusion of time and space. Therefore, the rabbit statue next to me on the photo at Geunjeongjeon Hall in Gyeongbokgung Palace is a symbol of the universe.
He might be small, but the symbolism is huge.

#Gyeongbokgung #SouthKorea #Seoul #Culture #JoseonDynasty #Palace #RabbitZodiac #Culture #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsInCulture #Rabbits #trivia

When I visited the Gyeongbokgung Palace in Seoul I saw a rabbit statue from the Korean Zodiac. This was a similar statue, albeit much smaller, to the one I saw at the Sik Sik Yuen temple in HongKong. 
Apparently the power of different animals were very important to the rulers of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1897) which is a defining period for Korean culture and identity. That is why the Gyeongbokgung Palace has a lot of figures of animals. 
Each of the animals have their own special personality and symbolic meaning, and what they represent can be largely divided into five categories: the king’s authority and dignity, auspicious signs, the law and justice, lucky symbols and protection from evil spirits, and the universe.

As for the Rabbit, he is a lucky symbol signifying long life, peace and well-being, and happiness. The Rabbit is also one out of Twelve Earthly Branches that shows that the universe is a fusion of time and space. Therefore, the rabbit statue next to me on the photo at Geunjeongjeon Hall in Gyeongbokgung Palace is a symbol of the universe. 
He might be small, but the symbolism is huge.

At the @nationalmuseumswe in Stockholm, I saw a very nice rabbit painting by French painter Alexandre-François Desportes.
The baroque painting, made in the 1720’s, is simply called “Rabbits”. Deportes was a renowned still life painter and he became elected to France’s Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture as an animal painter.

As such he was commissioned to make paintings by no others than Louis XIV and Louis XV.

It seems like rabbit paintings are good to have on one’s resume.

#AlexandreFrançoisDesportes #Rabbits #France #Stockholm #Culture #LouisXIV #BaroqueEra #Baroque #OilPaintings #FrenchPainter #StockholmNationalMuseuem #RabbitsInArt #Culture #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsInCulture #trivia

At the @nationalmuseumswe in Stockholm, I saw a very nice rabbit painting by French painter Alexandre-François Desportes. 
The baroque painting, made in the 1720’s,  is simply called “Rabbits”. Deportes was a renowned still life painter and he became elected to France’s Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture as an animal painter.

As such he was commissioned to make paintings by no others than Louis XIV and Louis XV.

It seems like rabbit paintings are good to have on one’s resume.

When reading the weekend newspaper supplement, I read something very interesting.
Did you know that the record for the highest price paid at auction for a living artist, is for a rabbit sculpture named “Rabbit”? Well.. of course it is!

The shiny, stainless steel rabbit made headlines in the art world after it was sold for USD$91.1 million at Christie’s in May.

The man behind “Rabbit” is made by American artist Jeffrey Koons who has made many other famous contemporary art works. “Rabbit” was sold to American billionaire hedge fund manager and avid art collector Steven Cohen.

With a rabbit sculpture in his possession, it seems like Steven just got a bit richer.
#JeffKoons #Rabbits #Christies #Culture #ModernArt #ContemporaryArt #SteveCohen #Auction #StockholmNationalMuseuem #RabbitsInArt #Culture #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsInCulture #trivia

When reading the weekend newspaper supplement, I read something very interesting. 
Did you know that the record for the highest price paid at auction for a living artist, is for a rabbit sculpture named “Rabbit”? Well.. of course it is!

The shiny, stainless steel rabbit made headlines in the art world after it was sold for USD$91.1 million at Christie's in May.

The man behind “Rabbit” is made by American artist Jeffrey Koons who has made many other famous contemporary art works. “Rabbit” was sold to American billionaire hedge fund manager and avid art collector Steven Cohen.

With a rabbit sculpture in his possession, it seems like Steven just got a bit richer.

Yesterday, when strolling the streets of Lucerne, I saw a logo that caught my attention. The logo was for the cosy restaurant Le Lapin. Dinner plans were quickly changed and a reservation at the rabbit-themed restaurant was made.

While having a nice rustic Swiss meal at The Lapin, the owner of the family run hotel-restaurant told me that the name came about as a play on words as the hotel is called Hotel De La Paix. The owner wanted an animal name that was close to “La Paix”. If this rabbitesque restaurant has a connection to peacefulness, the contrary can be said about a very specific rabbit-influenced cabaret in Paris. This is something I hinted to when posting about the Rabbit Park in Seoul.
So, be sure to follow us down this rabbit hole in the next post, as we will address a most agile dancing rabbit.

#LeLapinLucerne #Rabbits #Culture #Switzerland #Lucerne #Restaurants #GuideMichelin #Culture #Rabbit #兔 #RabbitsInCulture #trivia

Yesterday, when strolling the streets of Lucerne, I saw a logo that caught my attention. The logo was for the cosy restaurant Le Lapin. Dinner plans were quickly changed and  a reservation at the rabbit-themed restaurant was made.

While having a nice rustic Swiss meal at The Lapin, the owner of the family run hotel-restaurant told me that the name came about as a play on words as the hotel is called Hotel De La Paix. The owner wanted an animal name that was close to “La Paix”. If this rabbitesque restaurant has a connection to peacefulness, the contrary can be said about a very specific rabbit-influenced cabaret in Paris. This is something I hinted to when posting about the Rabbit Park in Seoul. 
So, be sure to follow us down this rabbit hole in the next post, as we will address a most agile dancing rabbit.

First post coming from #cambridge . Picked up some awesome Rabbit cards @arkcambridge.co.uk #RabbitTravel #rabbits #rabbitsofinstagram #rabbitcards